“The OK Boss” is available used, on Amazon

“The OK Boss” is one of Muriel James’ many reader-friendly guides on how to apply TA to everyday life situations. As she states in the introduction, “ At one time or another, almost everyone is a boss: Parents, spouses, teachers, and employers”.  Here, she shows you how you can become an OK boss using TA techniques, using stories and familiar workplace scenarios that so many can relate to. The objective is for the reader to recognize the bossing styles of others and of themselves, to understand their behaviors, and their OK and not OK attitudes at work and at home.

Bossing Styles:

The Critic—from (not OK) Critical Dictator to  (OK) Informed Critic

The Coach—from (not OK) Benevolent Dictator to (OK) Supportive Coach

The Shadow–from (not OK) Loner to (OK) Liberator

The Analyst—from (not OK) Computer to (OK) Communicator

The Pacifier—from (not OK) Milquetoast to (OK) Negotiator

The Fighter—from (not OK) Punk to (OK) Partner

The Inventor—from (not OK) Scatterbrain to (OK) Innovator

With each bossing style, Muriel James covers the personalities (ego states), how each type gives strokes, transaction patterns, games bosses play, life positions/scripts bosses act, appropriate contracts and time structuring.  At the end of each chapter, there are 3 areas touched upon. Self Discovery: Analyzing yourself and your behaviors. What to do: How to change, with the underlying message of ‘you have the power to make different choices for different outcomes’. Guidelines for effective and efficient bossing: Characteristics of the OK boss in relation to the area discussed.

“The OK Boss” is an older text, but certainly a gem. A little of the wording may show as a bit dated, however the material is easily applied to today’s workplaces. It’s a book not only for the bosses in the world, but also for those who have a ‘boss’ in their lives.

My favorite part was seeing the many illustrations sprinkled throughout each section. I loved how the structural diagrams were made to look like side profiles of faces, and the expressions and thought bubbles really brought the concepts to life.

Reviewed By Karen Rightler, TAP