I Don’t Need Therapy, But … Where Do I Turn for Answers? (free e-Book)


by Laurie Weiss

This free 59-page E-booklet addresses anger, grief, depression, responsibility, and personal change.

     “Even conscious, aware, growing people are often puzzled about what to do to solve specific problems in their lives. Although you may realize that you have influence over what happens to you and have been examining your life for some time, when a problem arises you want an answer, a solution, and you want it quickly. Here are answers to questions often asked by people who are growing. They are practical guidelines for getting unstuck and moving on with your life.”

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This e-booklet is a great summary of TA ideas and how you can apply them toward your own personal transformation.  It also has great information for practitioners!  To learn more about TA and to join USATAA, click the link below.

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Transactional Analysis and Social Roles

by Dr. Bernd Schmid, TSTA

TA: Personality, Social roles

Abstract

     In this article the most important TA concepts will be described in such a way that they do not automatically convey the ideas and attitudes of professional psychotherapists or even mere psychological descriptions of reality. Most of the methods of thinking or action familiar from classical TA have been retained, but are formulated in such a way that they can be specified in various areas of Society by varying professionals according to their respective roles and contexts.

The concept of role used here does not coincide with its common meaning in sociology and social psychology (e.g. Popitz, 1967). Roles are partially a question of social Standards in the sense of social patterns of expectation, but nevertheless role experience, role behavior and role relationships of people are seen as the individual’s task of creating. Understanding how to deal with roles in our Society is considered essential for Professional encounters and professionalisation.

l will first describe the concepts from the perspective of the individual. Then l will follow the concepts from the perspective of relationships.

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You may also like:

     Handling those Difficult People

     Building Community through Cooperation

Working Styles, Chapter 6 of Working it Out at Work

Could this be you?

Chris gets through a lot of work, by doing everything very quickly. Chris moves fast, thinks fast, talks fast, and seems to do everything so much more quickly than most people.

However, every so often Chris makes a mistake through rushing so much – and then it takes twice as long to put it right – especially as Chris seems intent on finding a shortcut instead of taking time to work it through again.

Chris also has a bad habit of arriving late at meetings, and of needing to leave early to get to the next meeting! And during the meeting Chris is quite likely to be openly impatient and interrupt a lot, so that people feel pressured and hurried.

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Dishonesty and Neurosis

[Note: this article begins with several Patient/Therapist dialog examples; the author discusses their implications in a section at the end of the article.]

Pt: (Looking down and back up) I don’t know what’s the matter with me…
Ther: (Thinks “I’m supposed to ask what’s the matter with him, but he’s pretty passive, so I’ll wait”)
Pt: (After a long pause) I guess I’m sorta… I don’t know…. depressed. I guess.
Ther: But you’re not sure?
Pt: Yeah, I’m…. I guess… I’m depressed all right.
Ther: Did you know that when you came in, or did you just figure that out?
Pt: I guess I knew it when I came in… sorta, anyway.
Ther: But you said you didn’t know. I’m puzzled.
Pt: Well, I guess I kinda knew, but… (long pause) My wife and I had this big argument last night, and…
Ther: (interrupting) Is this about your depression?
Pt: Yeah! See..
Ther: (interrupting) We can come back to that in a few minutes. I’m feeling unfinished about what we started with.
Pt: (looks puzzled) What….?
Ther: When you said you didn’t know what was the matter with you, but then later you said you did know. I said I was puzzled by that.
Pt: I don’t know what you mean (half-smile, looks down, then back up).
Ther: (Thinks “Now I have to make a choice, to stay with the earlier confusion or this second instance, because he certainly does know what I mean. The pattern is he professes to be confused when he really for some reason doesn’t want to connect directly. I’ll stay with the current instance because it’s the same issue but maybe a little clearer…”) (smiling) Why do you say you don’t know what I mean when in fact you do? Seems to be almost habitual.
Pt: It gives me time to think, I guess. Yeah, I guess that’s it.
Ther: (Thinks “He never says things straight out, but always with the ‘I guess’ or ‘soda’… I wonder if that’s part of the same mechanism”) Does it seem to you that you’re under time pressure to answer me? (before client can reply, therapist continues:) Take all the time you want (grins).
Pt: (looks uncomfortable) Yeah, I guess I…
Ther: (interrupts, says with emphasis:) No, take all the time you want.
Pt: What? Oh. I’m.. I guess I I don’t know why I do that.
Ther: I don’t agree with you. You do that so consistently, in such an organized way, that I’m convinced there is a specific purpose behind your behavior, even if it’s not easy to put into words.
Pt: I guess I’ve always done that.
Ther: (Thinks “At least he acknowledges what he’s doing. A step in the right direction ) (Half-way through a session.
Pt is a nurse who is chronically suicidal and sometimes depressed)

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Jamaica Gathering – 2009

Jamaica Gathering – 2009

USATAA Gathering

January 31-February 7
Frenchman’s Cove, Port Antonio, Jamaica

A week of professional development, relaxation, community, and play. Earn Continuing Education Credit while sharing ideas and practices with colleagues from the US and around the world. Register early to secure your place. Contact Dianne Maki c/o communications@usataa.org for more information. We would love to have you join us!Image

Frenchman’s Cove (www.frenchmans-cove-resort.com) is a rustic rain-forest property with a Great House, villas dotted throughout the 45-acre property, and a cove where the sea splashes onto white sands. Roads from the Great House to the villas and to the beach are great for walking and birding under a lush forest cover.

For general information contact: K. Dianne Maki / 908-234-1873 or dianne@makisethi.com
Pre-register with a non-refundable $50 deposit before December 1, 2008. Balance due December 31, 2008.

A Gathering is a conference without pre-arranged workshops where we create the daily program as we go along. Ask for a topic you’d like to learn about, offer a workshop you’re working on, try an article out on your peers, or simply join in. Everyone participates as leader and follower, teacher and learner. Think of what you want to share and bring the materials with you to make it happen.

“It’s a Free Child experience.”

Fee $750.00 USD includes: 7 nights stay, room, breakfast, luncheon on the beach, 1 evening meal, gratuities, Gathering Registration and USATAA 2009 Membership
Download the Registration Form.

See also this NY Times article about Jamaica:
Jamaica: After the Stars and the Storms, a Place to Relax